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Power Apps portals capacity consumption reporting is now available

Overview Administrators can now get visibility of their Power Apps portals logins and page views consumption by downloading these reports from the Power Platform admin center. These Excel-based reports allow you to look at the capacity consumed in a 30-day period...

How Microsoft Business Applications Group Drives Employee Training Using Dynamics 365 Power Platform

Every organization has growing needs for year-round internal employee training. The Microsoft Business Applications Group (BAG) Operations team used Dynamics 365 and Power Apps Portals to build an Employee Training Registration solution that enables employees to find, register, manage,...

Announcing Microsoft Information Protection Sensitivity Labels in Power BI Desktop (Public Preview)

About a year ago, the Power BI team introduced data protection capabilities into the Power BI service, making Power BI the first and only BI product to support Microsoft Information Protection sensitivity labels, helping enterprises classify content and protect...

Power Apps Community call closing out 2020 with amazing holiday themed Apps December 16th

We now have one more thing to look forward to the end of 2020. December 16th will have an amazing Power Apps holiday themed community call with Clarissa Gillingham, Jese Navaranjan and Sharon Sumner all hosted by our very own...

Microsoft Dataverse support for Power BI Direct Query reaches general availability

We are very happy to announce that Microsoft Dataverse support for Power BI Direct Query has reached general availability status. With the combination of the new Dataverse connector for Power BI and tabular data stream (TDS) endpoint Power BI...

Announcing new Admin APIs and Service Principal authentication to make for better tenant metadata scanning

Power BI enables organizations to adopt a data-driven culture where every person can get value from data. With the massive amounts of self-service data generated in Power BI, our Power BI customers tell us about a number of emerging...

IKEA Sweden – Reimagining the customer experience with Microsoft Power Platform

IKEA is a Swedish company that was established in 1943. The company designs and sells ready-to-assemble furniture, kitchen appliances and home products, among other goods and home services. Across the globe, IKEA has 211,000 employees, 433 stores, and...

Turbocharge your model-driven apps by transitioning away from synchronous requests

Jesse Parsons, Principal Software Engineer, Wednesday, April 22, 2020 Model-driven apps are highly customizable and can pull data from many different sources to satisfy your business needs.  When using...

Announcing: Copy a Visual as an Image

Introducing the ability to copy a visual as an image to your clipboard! Today, we’re excited to announce you can easily share a captured image of a dashboard tile or a report visual with just one click! Here is what a copied visual would look like in an email –  You can now copy a...

Priceline optimizes retail store operations with Microsoft Power Platform

“The speed at which I could build out these on-screen components helped me realize the appeal of low-code platforms. Power Apps has a lot to offer even to the most experienced developers among us.” – James Matson, IT Retail Innovation...

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Power Fx: Error handling graduates to preview

We are thrilled to announce that the long-time experimental feature Formula-level error handling has moved forward to preview. As a result, you and your end users will enjoy higher reliability and more transparency about what is happening in your apps. It’s a huge step. Adding error handling to an existing language turned out to be a very tall order, touching almost everything, from data types, to functions, to the runtime. Thank you for all of your support, feedback, and patience as we got this done. What does it mean for you? Your apps will more reliably detect and report errors.You can write blank/null values to a database.You can detect and replace errors with the IsError, IsErrorOrBlank, and IfError functions.You can control error reporting and logging at a central location with App.OnError.You can create and throw your own custom errors with the Error function. Error handling is a big change in behavior. By entering preview, we are signaling that we believe we are done, that we anticipate no further significant changes from here. Many of you already use error handling in production and this move to preview should only embolden more of you to do so. If significant changes are needed from here, we will treat them as a separate feature. We are rolling this out slowly as it is such a big change. All of you will soon see that the Formula-level error handling switch has moved from experimental to preview in the settings (as of version 3.22082). It will still be default to off for most tenants. Over the coming weeks we will slowly change the default for new apps only to on across the tenants. Makers can still disable this feature and will be able to do so for a long time. I say again: we are changing the default for new apps only. Existing apps will continue running as they always have. We have no plans at this time to turn this on for existing apps, and as this is such a big change, we may never do this and make this a permanently available switch. Your feedback will guide us. The documentation for Error, IfError, IsError, IsErrorOrBlank functions and the App.OnError property covers these changes. IfError and IsError are very similar to their Excel counterparts. We are also working on overview docs that will be released shortly. But before that, let’s take a brief tour. Let’s start with what Excel does, the inspiration for Power Fx. For an error like division by zero, Excel is very clear that something has gone wrong with a # error message that shows right in the cell. This error will propagate to other cell formulas if A1 is used in a formula: Today, without error handling, Power Apps won’t report anything in this scenario, instead treating the division by zero error as a blank value. That’s not good, as the maker and the end user of the app have no idea something may have gone wrong: Errors happen. Unexpected data flows in, networks go down, storage fills up, to name just a few situations that an app may encounter in the real world. Makers don’t often think through all the ways that things can go sideways which makes default error handling even more important. Returning a blank for an error is also a problem because blank is a legitimate value in our type system and in many databases. Without error handling, Power Apps won’t allow you to write a blank to a database instead thinking it is an error. So, instead of returning an easy to ignore or misinterpret blank value, with error handling turned on we now report an error to the end user (the error banner) and show the formula as having an error to the maker (the red filled in circle on the control): Further, if you look at the value of the formula, it is not a blank but an error value. Just as any formula can result in a blank, now any formula can also result in an error: Now, we still aren’t showing an error in the label control itself as Excel does. We couldn’t do this generically because, unlike Excel, the error could be on a property of a control for which there is no way to display the error. For example, where should an error on a slider control? Where should an error be shown for an imperative operation in the middle of a button’s OnSelect formula? We settled on showing the end user banner and flagging the control in the design experience. That’s not to say you can’t detect and display an error in that label control. Error handling provides a wealth of mechanisms to control how errors are handled and reported. For example in this case, we can wrap the division by zero with an IfError function to return a custom message in the label: The Text function call is required for type compatibility. Or we can use IfError to throw a different, more specific error with the Error function: Or we can have a catchall for all errors in the app with App.OnError. For example, we can log the error and present a different message to the end user: If we look at the log, we see the details of the captured error from FirstError (and there is also an AllErrors), including where it happened and when it was detected: The possibilities are endless! You now have all the tools you need to detect, replace, report, and log errors, including a good default behavior if you never take advantage of these tools. And, bonus, you can also now write blank (or null) values to databases. Please let us know what you think in the Power Apps community forum. There is a dedicated and active space for error handling discussions at Error Handling – Power Platform Community (microsoft.com).
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